CPHA Canvax

CANVax in Brief are short evidence based articles published monthly, that aim to inform, engage and inspire its readers by bringing attention to current and emerging issues in immunization, and by profiling initiatives and activities from across Canada that aim to improve vaccine acceptance and uptake.

Contributions to CANVax in Brief are by invitation only. All articles are reviewed by CANVax staff and occasionally by invited topic experts prior to publication. If you have questions about CANVax in Brief, contact us.  
 

February 6, 2019

Immunizing kids is important. Helping them overcome pain and fear of immunization is important too.

Lucie Marisa Bucci - Senior Manager (Immunize Canada)

Immunizing school children is an effective way to increase coverage. Most public health jurisdictions in Canada have school immunization programs, which roll out meningococcal, hepatitis B and HPV vaccines, among others. The positive outcomes of these programs are numerous. Yet, we are just beginning to learn that a substantial number of children who receive vaccines at school have negative experiences. Often these negative experiences are attributed to pain and fear of needles. For some children, injection needles conjure anxiety and distress that can perpetuate into episodes of fainting, and eventually to vaccine refusals.


January 2, 2019

Fake News and Science Denier Attacks on Vaccines. What can healthcare professionals do?

Noni MacDonald - Professor of Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

Never before has the public been so bombarded by information, nor has it ever been so difficult to know what and who to believe. Misinformation is contagious; with fake news travelling faster and farther than truth. Science deniers, including vaccine science deniers, have a strong and very effective platform now - the web - from which to shill their scientifically bankrupt wares. We, who understand the rigor of science and know the evidence supporting immunization for health and well-being, are often aghast at the falsehoods being promulgated - and indeed- too often accepted and acted upon by members of the public. For example, in the US, the variation HPV vaccine uptake across the country is better explained by exposure to tweets about HPV than by socioeconomic class data.


December 4, 2018

Optimizing communication tools to address vaccine hesitancy

Ève Dubé - Medical Anthropologist, Researcher

Vaccine hesitancy (the reluctance to accept recommended vaccines) is a complex issue that poses risk communication problems for public health agencies. Studies have shown that providing information and communicating evidence of vaccine safety and efficacy to those who are vaccine-hesitant has done little to stem the growth of hesitancy-related beliefs and fears. In this CANVax in Brief, we highlight good practices informed by research evidences in developing communication materials to address vaccine hesitancy.


November 19, 2018

Welcome to CANVax in Brief

The CANVax Team

The Canadian Vaccination Evidence Resource and Exchange Centre (CANVax) is an online database of resources to support immunization program planning and promotional activities to improve vaccine acceptance and uptake in Canada. CANVax aims to make it easier for public health professionals to find and collect resources by increasing access to information relevant to the Canadian context. CANVax is the first online database of its kind in Canada to equip public health professionals with access to a centralized resource centre focused on vaccine acceptance and uptake.