CPHA Canvax

CANVax in Brief are short evidence-based articles that aim to inform, engage and inspire its readers by bringing attention to current and emerging issues in immunization, and by profiling initiatives and activities from across Canada that aim to improve vaccine acceptance and uptake.

Contributions to CANVax in Brief are by invitation only. All articles are reviewed by CANVax staff and by the Expert Review Panel as part of the peer-review process prior to publication. If you have questions about CANVax in Brief, contact us

CANVax Brief Series - CANVax is collaborating with Canada Communicable Disease Report (CCDR) to publish short evidence-based briefs from our CANVax in Brief series throughout 2020. You can read our articles here.

 

Anxiety and Pain Management

April 8, 2019

Immunization stress-related responses: Improving our understanding of a type of adverse event following vaccination

C. Meghan McMurtry - PhD, C.Psych, Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Guelph.

This brief has been updated for publication in the Canada Communicable Disease Report (CCDR). To read the updated version in the CANVax Brief Series, please visit Managing immunization stress-related response: A contributor to sustaining trust in vaccines. The original version of this CANVax b…


February 6, 2019

Immunizing kids is important. Helping them overcome pain and fear of immunization is important too.

Lucie Marisa Bucci - Senior Manager (Immunize Canada)

Immunizing school children is an effective way to increase coverage. Most public health jurisdictions in Canada have school immunization programs, which roll out meningococcal, hepatitis B and HPV vaccines, among others. The positive outcomes of these programs are numerous. Yet, we are just beginning to learn that a substantial number of children who receive vaccines at school have negative experiences. Often these negative experiences are attributed to pain and fear of needles. For some children, injection needles conjure anxiety and distress that can perpetuate into episodes of fainting, and eventually to vaccine refusals.